Seed Saving Information

Locally adapted seeds, heritage seeds, heirloom seeds, non-gmo seeds, open pollinated seeds. These are the foundation of food security. These are the seeds you can plant, grow, save then plant, grow and save – again and again, reliably, for generations. These are the seeds that have kept us alive throughout history.

Details of Your Saved Seeds

Name of plant: common name i.e. Carrot

Variety: i.e. Dragon

Botanic name: i.e. Daucus carota

Brief description: i.e. purple carrots

Origin: where harvested i.e. Bellingen, Coffs, Dorrigo, etc

Date harvested: i.e. March 2013.

Sowing instructions: i.e. season, after frost, depth, spacing, sow direct or not etc.

Growing instructions: i.e. sun or shade, water needs, frost sensitive, needs trellis etc.

Uses & special notes: i.e. tasty eating carrot that’s purple on the outside & orange inside

Warning: if applicable

BSS Member Name: for internal records only, not published

Contact – email/phone:

Do you wish to ‘adopt’ this seed? Yes / No
That means, to commit to continue to grow this variety to make sure it stays in the area.

Download this as a text file or as an editable PDF file

How Many Seeds Per Packet?

10 seeds – very big, diffcult-to-find seeds or you don’t need many in a garden ie lima, broadbean

15-20 – bigger seeds – beans, pumpkin and other cucurbits – cucumber, zucchini, watermelon

25-30 – peas

30-40 – medium sized seeds – bok choy, beetroot, broccoli, cabbage, capsicum, chilli, eggplant, silverbeet, spinach

40-50 – smaller seeds or ones you have a lot of ie amaranth, basil, coriander, lettuce, mustard, onion, rocket, tomato

60-80 – very small seeds or crops that you need a lot of in the garden, or whose seeds are not always so viable ie carrots, cereals, poppy, radish, daikon

100 – seeds which need to be grown in large quantities for correct genetic diversity ie corn, sunfower

Download How Many Seeds as a PDF

Sow What When (Mid North Coast NSW)

All Year

spring onion
radish – daikon
lettuce
kale

Spring

lettuce
beans
capsicum
chilli
basil
eggplant
zucchini
okra
rosella
artichoke
tomato
spring onion
water chestnut
cucumber
corn
amaranth
dill

Summer

lettuce
beans
capsicum
chilli
basil
eggplant
zucchini
okra
rosella
artichoke
tomato
spring onion
water chestnut
cucumber
corn
amaranth
dill

Autumn

beans
beetroot
all brassicas – (cabbage broccoli cauliflower brussel sprouts collards, chinese cabbage, bok choy, pak choy)
broadbeans
carrot
celeriac
celery
coriander
fennel
garlic
kale
kohlrabi
leeks
lettuces
mizuna
onions
parsnip
peas
potato
radish – including daikon
rocket
salsify
silverbeet
snowpeas
spring onion
spinach
turnip

Winter

beetroot
all brassicas – (cabbage broccoli cauliflower brussel sprouts collards, chinese cabbage, bok choy, pak choy)
broadbeans
carrot
celeriac
celery
coriander
fennel
garlic
kale
kohlrabi
leeks
lettuces
mizuna
onions
parsnip
peas
potato
radish – including daikon
rocket
salsify
silverbeet
snowpeas
spring onion
spinach
turnip

The Seed Savers Handbook - Information on seed saving: heritage seeds, heirloom seeds, vegetable seeds, rare seeds, seasonal vegetables, heirloom vegetables, planting vegetables, food gardening.
The Seed Savers Handbook - Information on seed saving: heritage seeds, heirloom seeds, vegetable seeds, rare seeds, seasonal vegetables, heirloom vegetables, planting vegetables, food gardening.

The Seed Savers’ Handbook

The Seed Savers’ Handbook is a complete reference for growing, preparing and conserving 117 traditional varieties of food plants.

It was written in 1993 by Michel and Jude Fanton, founders of The Seed Savers’ Network, especially for Australian and New Zealand cultures. It is however applicable to all situations.

The Seed Savers’ Handbook has 180 pages with stunning original illustrations.

Purchase the book in the Seed Savers Network Shop
$AU32 Free Shipping

Michel and Jude Fanton wrote The Seed Savers’ Handbook from experience and with a great deal of research. It has been a reliable reference book not just on propagating and breeding your own vegetables, but also for how to grow and use both common (corn, tomatoes, beans, cabbages, etc.,) and unusual vegetables, such as tumeric, peanuts and several species of gourds. Included are many Asian and South American vegetables, herbs and spices.

117 plants referenced in the handbook:

– Amaranth
– Artichoke
– Asparagus
– Basella
– Basil
– Bean
– Beetroot
– Bitter Gourd
– Borage
– Broad Bean
– Brussel Sprouts
– Cabbage
– Calendula
– Cape Gooseberry
– Capsicum & Chilli
– Cardoon
– Carrot
– Cassava
– Cauliflower
– Celeriac

– Celery
– Celtuce
– Chervil
– Chicory
– Chilacayote
– Chinese Cabbage
– Chives
– Choko
– Collard
– Coriander
– Corn
– Corn Salad
– Cowpea
– Cucumber
– Dandelion
– Dill
– Eggplant
– Endive
– Eschallot
– Fennel

– Garland Chrysanthemum
– Garlic
– Garlic Chives
– Gourd
– Gramma
– Guada Bean
– Hibiscus Spinach
– Hyacinth Bean
– Jerusalem Artichoke
– Kale
– Kohlrabi
– Korilla
– Leek
– Lettuce
– Lima Bean
– Luffa
– Marigold
– Marjoram
– Mint
– Mitsuba

– Mizuna
– Mustard
– Mustard Greens
– Nasturtium
– New Zealand Spinach
– Oca
– Okra
– Onion
– Oregano
– Oriental Cooking Melon
– Pansy & Violet
– Parsley
– Parsnip
– Pea
– Peanut
– Peruvian Parsnip
– Poppy
– Potato
– Pumpkin
– Queensland Arrowroot

– Radish
– Rhubarb
– Rocket
– Rockmelon
– Rosella
– Rosemary
– Runner Bean
– Sage
– Salad Burnet
– Salsify
– Silver Beet
– Snake Bean
– Sorrel
– Soya Bean
– Spinach
– Spring Onion
– Squash
– Sunflower
– Sweet Potato
– Taro

– Tarragon
– Thyme
– Tomato
– Tree Onion
– Tumeric
– Turnip
– Water Chestnut
– Water Spinach
– Watercress
– Watermelon
– Wax Gourd
– Winged Bean
– Yam
– Yam Bean